Nine (9) things to get along well with your Partner

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A healthy marriage relationship is one that is not always easy and one which there is no dispute between partners. The closest and longest married couples are committed to solving contentions in a mature way and grow together as a human being and as a lover. Here are some things that couple marriage experts advise most often to couple to strengthen their bond .

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1. Praise your spouse in front of others
Couples who maintain healthy relationships talk positively about each other in front of friends, children, relatives, and colleagues. This is the opposite of what happens in bad relationships. ‘My husband is very good at helping me.’, ‘My wife is really good at cooking.’ It is a good way to maintain a close and intimate relationship with the same words spontaneously popping out.

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2. It takes time to be together even when it is busy.
Good couples say they regularly take time out for each other in their daily lives. Spend time with your dog, take a walk together, talk after your child is asleep, watch your favorite TV shows, or pray together.

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3. Often smile
Smile a lot with each other. One of them is acting to brighten the mood, so it’s hard to be upset for a long time. I need to talk about serious topics when I need them, but the sense of humor is tremendously helpful in maintaining a healthy relationship. People who laugh a lot and are generally not too serious can easily enjoy a healthier relationship.

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4.Appreciate each other of the positive aspect rather than continuing to talk about the negative aspects of your partner.

You could have a couple of complaints about your marriage. But in most cases people have similar problems like other couples. Good couples see the good side of the opponent rather than the complaint, and express it immediately if there is something thankful for the opponent.

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5. If there would be winners in arguments, let it be your partner.
Disagreements are normal in a relationship. Couples who always sympathize with each other and listen with each other tend to overcome common misunderstandings in all relationships. If you have these conflict management skills, you may feel that your partner is listening, understanding and appreciating when you say, “I do not agree with you, but I understand you and understand why you feel that way.”

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6. Always tell your whereabouts
Don’t let your spouse neglected. If you tell your whereabouts through a short phone call or text, or and when you have an appointment with your friends, you can improve your marital status and help your partner feel at ease.
7.Don’t fail to be romantic
It’s a way for couples to enjoy each other’s love and excitement. If you do not tempt each other, the relationship becomes plain and boring. Good couples always try to attract each other.

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8. Fight Clean During Arguments
Improve your discussion. Be careful not to blame, not to stigmatize, not to discourage. Insert a joke at a most difficult time. When the couple spoke to each other, be careful with hurting words. A good couple always loves and respects each other.

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9. Forgive and surrender without grudging
You should not have any emotional distance from each other . Be responsible for your own mistakes, apologize and cross over. Even if you disagree about something just an hour ago, enjoy your life together.

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Ways To Feel Happier

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Meditate
It might be an incredibly frustrating past-time to master, but the benefits make it worth sticking with. In research published in Depression and Anxiety, results showed the efficacy of meditative therapies in reducing anxiety symptoms.

Slipping into a meditative state can also light up the area of your noggin that controls complex thoughts and positive emotions. Some meditation can also build mental muscle in the brain’s other hubs for compassion, empathy and fear, allowing you greater mastery over your emotions and helping you feel closer to others. Om-en to that.

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Be altruistic
Yep, this is meant to be about you getting happier but it turns out, giving to others makes you feel great as well. Research finds that acts of kindness, especially spontaneous, out-of-the ordinary ones, can boost happiness in the person doing the good deed. Why? Among other things (like promoting the idea of “paying if forward”), being kind promotes connection and community with others, which is one of the strongest factors in increasing happiness.

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Shorten your travel time 
Ah the long drive home. Just what you need, eh? Whether in your car or on public transport, it sucks big time. Studies show that moving closer to work – 20 minutes away is ideal – is linked to greater happiness as more of your spare time is yours to enjoy. Not for the T2 lanes to swallow whole.

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Get your sweat on.
But not for too long. In the greatest study there ever was, it turns out that even 7 minutes of exercise is beneficial for mood. Thanks Gretchen Reynolds and the New York Times for this gem! And in this study on exercise, yoga and depression found that getting sweaty demonstrated therapeutic effectiveness comparable with established depression and anxiety treatments. So workout regularly not just for the waist line but just as importantly, the mind as well.

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Get outside!
You don’t have to be a serial cycler, hiker or exercise-junkie to get the benefits of this one: just getting back to nature is important for sustained happiness. In a study by the David Suzuki Foundation , it was confirmed that a daily dose of nature boosts happiness and wellbeing.

In other research, 10,000 Canadians and over 250 workplaces participated in the David Suzuki Foundation’s Nature Challenge. The national program challenged participants to commit to getting out into nature for 30 minutes a day for 30 consecutive days. The results? “We found that participants almost doubled their time spent outside during the month and reduced their screen time by about 4.5 hours per week,” said Trent University Researcher, Dr Elizabeth Nisbet. “They reported significant increases in their sense of well-being, feeling more vitality and energy, while feelings of stress, negativity, and sleep disturbances were all reduced.”

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Get more sleep
Constantly yawning from lack of sleep? There’s a load of research to support the theory that lack of sleep hampers your happiness. As noted by the Woolcock Institute, insomnia symptoms extend into the daytime, affecting mood, concentration, memory and work performance. If that’s not enough to make you glum, we don’t know what is. Get at least 6 hours of sleep a night, and if you’re having reaching this modest number, consult your GP.

 

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Watch : Women Give A Beautiful Reminder To Let Go And Live Life

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Let’s admit it: Life can be stressful. In this day and age, women are feeling more and more pressured to be perfect, whether at work or at home. The thing is, while you focus on accomplishing success in your careers or being the ultimate mother, you sometimes start to miss out on the things that really matter, like spending time with your family, hanging out with your friends, or simply enjoying life.

This three-minute video from Sanctuary, which features women in their late 60s or 70, wants to remind you of that. In a survey commissioned by the British spa, researchers found that most women today are stressed and about 40 percent said they were close to burning out. In the video, one woman even had a realization saying, “I’d give myself the time to indulge in the things that I now understand are the most important.”

Sometimes, we need to remind ourselves of the things that matter most. Watch the video and don’t forget to stop and smell the roses!!

Credit: Cosmopolitan

Children of warmer and less controlling parents ‘grow up to be happier’

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A new lifelong study from University College London (UCL) in the UK, published in The Journal of Positive Psychology, has found a number of important predictors of mental wellbeing in adulthood based on their childhood environment.

The researchers assessed 5,362 British people aged 13-64 – forming a representative population for survey purposes – who were part of the Medical Research Council (MRC) National Survey of Health and Development (NSHD). This unique national survey has been tracking people since their birth in March 1946.

Of the study participants, 2,800 are under active follow-up, while complete wellbeing data was gathered for 3,699 participants at the ages of 13-15, reducing to around 2,000 participants by the ages of 60-64.

Using a 25-item questionnaire, the research team aimed to measure three different concepts of care.

To assess parental bonding, study participants were asked to agree with statements such as “appeared to understand my problems and worries.” Phrases such as “tried to control everything I did” were designed to assess psychological control, while disagreeing with statements such as “let me go out as often as I wanted” aimed to measure behavioral control.

Adults completed the questionnaires retrospectively to describe how they remembered their parents’ attitudes and behaviors before they were 16 years old.

The study controlled for confounding factors such as parental separation, childhood social class, maternal mental health and participants’ personality traits.

Psychological control ‘limits a child’s independence’
The effect on individuals with parents who exerted greater psychological control during childhood was found to lower their mental wellbeing during adulthood significantly – particularly during the ages of 60-64. This effect was so pronounced that the authors of the study liken it to the recent death of a close friend or relative.

Dr. Mai Stafford, reader in social epidemiology in the MRC Unit for Lifelong Health & Ageing at UCL, explains: “We found that people whose parents showed warmth and responsiveness had higher life satisfaction and better mental wellbeing throughout early, middle and late adulthood.”

Examples of psychological control which can limit a child’s independence and leave them less able to regulate their behavior include not allowing them to make their own decisions, not letting them have their own way, invading their privacy and fostering dependence (rather than independence).

From other studies, the research team also know that that if a child shares a secure emotional attachment with their parents, they are better able to form secure attachments in adult life.

Dr. Stafford says:

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Dr. Stafford adds that “policies to reduce economic and other pressures on parents could help them to foster better relationships with their children. Promoting a healthy work-life balance is important as parents need time to nurture relationships with their children.”

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Earlier this year, Medical News Today reported on a new study that showed how important it is for parents to avoid ‘overvaluing’ your child to prevent narcissism and the value of parents showing warmth to develop high self-esteem.

Cuddling With Your Partner Does Something Very Surprising to Your Health

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If you can’t get close enough to your significant other (or non-significant other), scientific studies have your back, quite literally. As it turns out, cuddling might as well be a miracle drug.

Most of us already know that cuddling with someone, be it our pets, best friends, partners or kids, makes us feel cozy, safe and warm. It’s what we want to do when it’s drafty in our apartments, or when The Walking Dead is on and we can’t handle watching zombies take big sloppy bites out of humans alone, or when we’re just bummed out and need a soft surface to lay our heads.

But could snuggling be scientifically proven to be healthy? Thank goodness — the answer is yes. Here are five reasons why:

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1. Cuddling makes us happier.
When you’re physically close to someone, you tend to feel happier and healthier. According to Women’s Health Magazine, “touching someone releases [dopamine and serotonin], both of which can boost your mood and curb depression.”

Furthermore, when a person is physically close to someone, his or her body releases oxytocin, another “happy chemical” that contributes to us cultivating and maintaining intimate, healthy relationships. According to Paul Zak, an expert on the beloved hormone and self-proclaimed “Dr. Love,” oxytocin is the “moral molecule behind all human virtue, trust, affection and love, a ‘social glue’ that keeps society together.” A hand hold, a snuggle, a hug — all of these actions supposedly increase levels of oxytocin.

Oxytocin isn’t necessarily a miracle molecule, of course. Jennifer Bartz from the Mount Sinai School of Medicine, for example, discovered that the effects of oxytocin really depend on an individual’s personality and perspective, according to Slate. But several studies have pointed to the molecule’s ability to promote “feelings of devotion, trust and bonding” between people, giving oxytocin its title of “the bonding hormone.”

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2. Cuddling can strengthen our immune systems.
Intimacy is healthy. The human touch has been shown to drop a person’s levels of cortisol, the main biological culprit of stress. As Roberta Lee of Beth Israel Medical Center in New York explains, “Cortisol suppresses the immune response. Anything that increases the relaxation response triggers the restoration of your immune response.”

The result: Your body is more able to fight off viruses and inflammation, making you happier and healthier.

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3. Cuddling makes us less anxious.
Not only does close proximity to other humans make you feel happier, it can also decrease your worries and anxiety. When you touch someone, the skin-on-skin contact signals your adrenal glands to cease excessive amounts of cortisol production, the aforementioned stress hormone.

“Having this friendly touch, just somebody simply touching our arm and holding it, buffers the physiological consequences of this stressful response,” Matt Hertenstein of DePauw University told NPR.

James Coan, an assistant professor at the University of Virginia, conducted a study that illustrated the helpfulness of the human touch, specifically hand holding. While administering MRIs, he warned 16 married women that they might “experience shock.” Each woman’s state of anxiety was instantly illuminated in the MRI scans. But when these women held each other’s hands for comfort, their elevated stress response subsided. When their husbands held their hands, the ladies grew even more relaxed.

“There was a qualitative shift in the number of regions in the brain that just weren’t reacting anymore to the threat cue, Coan told CNN. As Coan and his colleagues noted in their paper on the study, marital hand-holding influenced the neural activation in the hypothalamus, which in turn influences the release of cortisol.

4. Cuddling could help us sleep better.
Oxytocin does more than help us bond and potentially increase happiness. Since increased levels of oxytocin help you relax and reduce high blood pressure, it could also be connected with better sleep alongside your partner, Rachel E. Salas of the Johns Hopkins Center for Sleep suggested.

Moreover, studies have found “suggestive evidence that couples’ emotional closeness and physical intimacy during the daytime and prior to bedtime may promote sleep,” which we’d presume makes each bed partner happier — read: less grumpy — the next day. So get your eight hours with your significant other or another warm body by your side.

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5. Cuddling goes hand-in-hand with closer relationships.
Studies have shown that couples that regularly cuddle and snuggle in bed are most likely in healthier relationships.

“One of the most important differences involved touching. Ninety-four percent of couples who spent the night in contact with one another were happy with their relationship, compared to just 68% of those that didn’t touch,” Richard Wiseman, a psychologist at the University of Hertfordshire in England told the Telegraph. While 68% isn’t the lowest number in the world, 94% would seem to reflect positively on the effectiveness of cuddling and touching at night.

Moreover, couples who used to be more physically affectionate but have since cut back on cuddling could potentially be in bad shape. According to Wiseman, “If you have a couple who used to sleep close together but are now drifting further apart in bed, then that could [be] symptomatic of them growing apart when they are awake.”

The bottom line? Cuddling is definitively excellent. So if you want to spend the evening cuddled up on the couch with the closest person you can find, you should. Because science says so, and you would be doing your body some good.