Weird Ingredient: Blood in Foods, Be Familiar

gellato

Cooking with animal blood is as old as civilization itself. I promise that your ancient ancestors, no matter where you’re from, didn’t have the luxury of throwing away any part of the animal, including the very lifeblood that used to run through it. Animal blood, along with everything but the skin, would invariably end up in the stew.

Unfortunately, as we’ve moved away from rural living, our connection with what we consume has been lost and our modern urban sensibilities would much prefer our meat to be as sanitized as possible. And sadly, that means no blood.

But many cultures around the world continue to cook with blood and there are solid reasons to inform the eating customers to what contains the dish served to them.

Blood & Chocolate Pudding

This is something sweet and off-kilter to make, this recipe for Sanguinaccio Dolce is an old Italian blood and chocolate pudding that can also be used in gelato!

blood pudding
Blood Sausage

blood sausage
Perhaps the most popular “blood” dish is blood sausage (aka black pudding), which can be found in many forms in many cultures from around the world. Each cultures puts its own spin on the sausage prepared with blood (usually pig’s). Here’s morcilla from Spain, which contains pig’s blood, rice, and spices.

Scondae from Korea
Soondae from Korea uses cellophane noodles and barley to absorb the blood and sometimes contains kimchi, perilla leaves, and/or soybean paste for flavor.

boudin from France
Boudin noir from France is considered quite the delicacy among the charcuteries. The sausage is dry and can have little chunks of apple in it.

blutwurst
Finally blutwurst is as German as it gets. In parts of the Rhineland, horse meat is used.

Blood Pancakes

blood pancake
Blood pancakes, a highly popular dish in Finland (where it’s calledveriohukainen) and Sweden (named blodplättar), are very similar to normal pancakes, only with whipped blood as an ingredient. The finished product is more dark brown than red, so keep that in mind if you’re creating a colorful pancake masterpiece.

Source: food-hacks.wonderhowto.com/

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s